A Pumpkin Eclipse

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As the eclipse made its way over Patterson this morning, and the light in the sky dimmed like dusk, my first thought didn’t pertain to the rare astronomical wonder that was occurring. The event that captivated the country and seized the media’s attention in a way that we haven’t seen since OJ Simpson careened around Los Angeles in that damn white Ford Bronco.

No, as I peered from my kitchen window and watched the faded light dance on the trees outside, I felt something else that wasn’t celestial awe. Frankly, it was the hue of the sky that reminded me of something. Something that was very near and dear to my heart.

Why, the eclipse looked like… FALL!

My heart beats in an autumnal rhythm— it yearns for the shortening days of the fall, cool mornings and all things pumpkin-flavored. By this time of year, I actually have to tamper my excitement, lest it overflow and run amok— like a toddler in an inflatable jumpy house.

It is currently taking every effort of my soul not to prematurely put up my fall harvest decor— which includes scarecrows, ceramic pumpkins and candles so deliciously-scented that I would eat them if I knew the wax and chemicals wouldn’t make me vomit.

This kind of restraint is so difficult. I really, really want to pull out my box of autumn stuff. So badly. The same way a teenage boy longs for their PlayStation or a link to a free porn website.

To be honest, I can hear my fall decor calling to me in the hall closet each time I zoom by it in my wheelchair. It says things like:

Elizabette… we’re here, come free us!

Who cares what people think?

Don’t deny us. You know you want this.

Argh. The perky pumpkin voices are so alluring. You know that feeling when you’re a kid and you have a mosquito bite that you’re not supposed to scratch? And the more you don’t scratch it, the more you want to scratch it? Yeah, that. I bet Donald Trump gets the same feeling before he tweets something really stupid.

This would all be easier if the universe didn’t know that I adore fall. You may think this sounds insane— like the muddled ramblings of a girl that drinks too many pumpkin spice lattes. But, this doesn’t make it any less true.

pumpkinHere is Exhibit A.

A few days ago, we harvested these bell peppers from my garden. You will notice that they are shaped like mini pumpkins.

I didn’t tell them to do this. They grew like this voluntarily. Even the produce in my yard wants to be pumpkin-shaped!! It’s like an omen from the universe. A wonderful omen that fills my heart with joy.

But, I must wait just a little bit longer.

Oh, Fall, how I love thee. Soon, you shall be mine!

Commuters, Gladiators & Me

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After my experience with my last Spinraza injection, I came into Dose #3 like a soldier ready for battle. If there was a potential contingency, I had already thought of it— at least twice. I was like fucking General Dwight D. Eisenhower in advance of the invasion of Normandy. I was mentally and physically prepared. I had taken a mini Xanax and hydrated like an Olympic marathoner. I was ready. Fear me and my Spinraza greatness!!

On the morning of the injection, I woke up at 3:45am— a time when most reasonable folks are asleep. But, if you are President Donald Trump, it’s your favorite time to sit in the dark and send weird messages to your 36 million Twitter followers.

I got dressed, and we ventured out into the pre-dawn morning to make the trek from Patterson to Stanford. We encountered a purplish sunrise and about 765,983 damn commuters clogging the roadways.

I was distracted by my upcoming procedure by contemplating the utter horror all those drivers endure each day on the roads. How do they do it? How do they manage to survive that commute each and every day? Maybe they were the ones that needed the Xanax— not me.

We arrived well in advance of my appointment and managed to snag one of the coveted handicapped spots right in the front of the Neuroscience building. Getting one of those parking spots is like winning the lotto, only way better because you actually have a chance of winning. (Yes, I’m talking about you, feverish Powerball players. Let’s be real — the more millions in the jackpot, the less chance you will win. And spending more money to win isn’t a guarantee, either. Just ask Hillary Clinton.)

For each of my Spinraza injections thus far, I’ve had a different team of doctors performing the procedure. Stanford is a teaching institution, so there’s a rotating group of doctors eager to plunge that needle into my wonky, curvy spine. This time, my team was extra-confident. They strode into the room like Russell Crowe in Gladiator. After examining my scans, one doctor proudly announced, “I’ll get this done in 20 minutes.

My last procedure had taken over 90 minutes. In my mind, I thought, “Bullshit, Turbo. You’ve never met a spine like mine. I’m your damn Kilimanjaro. I’m fucking Mount Everest.

But, I stayed quiet. I didn’t want to squelch his enthusiasm. I also didn’t want to piss him off since he was the one with the really big needle.

I got into position on the table and they began. I listened to their low, confident chatter behind me as I let my mind wander. I thought about food— as I often do, generally. I was hungry since I had to fast for the hours prior to the procedure. I contemplated lunch….. and then I felt a zing of heat down my left leg.

Whoa– what was that?” I called out as my nerves quivered in response.

I’m in,” Dr. Confidence remarked behind me― like a member of the DAR coolly ordering a Cobb Salad at a country club.

My brain stalled for a moment. I looked up at the clock on the wall in front of me… a mere 20 minutes had passed. I had difficulty computing what he had said. I sputtered, “Wait— what?! Are you for real?

Yes. I’ve already begun to collect the spinal fluid before we inject the Spinraza.

Like a Looney Tunes cartoon character, my eyeballs began to bug out of my head, “Holy shit! You weren’t kidding at the beginning, were you?

Nope,” The Radiological Gladiator replied.

Elation flooded my veins. I felt like it had suddenly become Christmas Morning and Santa had brought me a really great present. Like a My Little Pony. Or an Easy Bake Oven. Or a $125,000 injection administered pain-free and in World Record Time. SWEET JESUS, SANTA IS REAL!

I was wheeled out of the fluoroscopy room just a few minutes later, my face wreathed in a smile, while clutching another, empty magic little vial in my fist. VICTORY WAS MINE!

Like Russell Crowe, I wanted to yell out, “My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius, commander of the Armies of the North, General of the Felix Legions, loyal servant to the true emperor, Marcus Aurelius. And I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next!!

I didn’t yell that, of course, because I didn’t want them to think that the Spinraza was making me psychotic.

So, instead, when I returned to the room, I gulped down some water, and a caffeinated Mountain Dew to ward off the spinal headache. Then, I scarfed down a sandwich and sent a flurry of texts to my loved ones— my more-nimble fingers flying across the screen like super-sonic gnats.

Yes… Spinraza works, mIMG_4323y friends!

xoxo

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Spinraza, Turkey Burgers And The Voices In My Head

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I had my 2nd injection of Spinraza earlier this week, so I’m pleased to report that I’m now worth a cumulative quarter million dollars. The little cells and neurons in my spinal fluid are so high-class that I fear that soon they’ll be too cool to spend time with me anymore. What if they forget their humble origins and do something snobbish— like adopt a British accent or befriend a Kardashian?!

The second injection was a little more painful than the first. Getting a needle through the labyrinth of my spine is no easy task— I’ve got metal rods in there to help with my scoliosis, some bony fusions and twisty vertebra. So, the doctor must slowly and carefully insert the needle, making microscopic adjustments and realignments as he/she goes. It’s like playing the classic board game Operation— one wrong move and the buzzer goes off. But, instead of a buzzer, they’ll hear me yell, “Argh! What the $&@#!

So, yeah, it’s kinda fun.

But, the excellent neuroscience team hit the bulls-eye— even though it took a little longer than I would have liked. I lay on the table, on my left side, for over an hour as they worked their magic. I stared at the wall and tried to ignore the pain in my shoulder from maintaining the position they require for the injection. I tried thinking of things that would distract me— what food I’d order at the restaurant later on… why I seemed to be drooling so much on my hospital-issue pillow… and when would the pumpkin spice lattes finally return to Starbucks this autumn?

As I was approaching the end of my tether, I felt the tears slide in and I began to cry. Not the cute kind of crying, of course, but the wet, snuffly kind. The kind reserved for Hallmark commercials and cheesy movies like The Notebook and Rambo.

But, then, I heard a voice in my head… a teasing, yet urgent voice that was surprisingly insistent, “Come on now… NO PAIN, NO GAIN!” I recognized the booming voice instantly as my late uncle, John. It was comforting to hear his voice and it helped me push through that moment. I’m not a person that generally hears voices (I may have many other medical issues, but that ain’t one of them)… yet, that gravely, stubborn encouragement was just what I needed.

The end result makes all the pain and discomfort worth it, though. At the beginning of my journey, my neurologist told me that our goal was stabilization— to halt the progression of my Spinal Muscular Atrophy. That would be a victory. That would add years to my life. Any gains, even minuscule ones, would be icing on the metaphorical cake (if that cake cost $125,000 a slice).

As I mentioned in my last blog post, I began to see improvements very quickly after my first treatment. In the days since my second, I’ve felt tightening in the muscles of my back, legs and shoulders. I also managed to pick up a hefty turkey burger (something I couldn’t do easily before) and shove it in my mouth like a starving Chris Christie. I was so proud of myself. It didn’t seem to matter that I got meat juice and condiments all over myself— that wasn’t the point. The point is, I ate it without using a fork and a knife. I OWNED that turkey burger. That burger was my bitch. It was awesome. I bet Donald Trump felt the same way about Chris Christie during the election, too.

IMG_4299Anyway, soon I’ll be headed back to Stanford for Dose #3… stay tuned for more Spinraza fun!

xoxo