A Germaphobe’s Guide to the Holidays

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I love everything about the holidays. The music. The food. The carbs. The festive spirit that makes even the dumbest Hallmark movie seem quaint and charming. While I eschew The Hallmark Channel for the other 11 months of the year, for these few weeks, I tolerate the weak plot lines, terrible acting, and the tons of synthetic snow they import from China. I suspend my cynicism and convince myself that this stuff is A-OK— you know, just like Matt Lauer did with his overactive penis.

Anyway, while this season heralds many wonderful things (the extended holiday selection at Starbucks being one of my particular favorites), not everything about this time of year is so great. Yes, I’m talking about all the cold & flu viral cooties that float around faster than Hallmark’s plastic snowflakes. For the average person, this is only a minor annoyance. Perhaps some sniffles here and there, and odd sick day from work. Nothing that Tylenol Cold and a shot of whiskey can’t handle.

But, for someone with spinal muscular atrophy, like me, a minor cold can turn into fucking Armageddon. Like the kind with Bruce Willis and that damn asteroid. Or the kind that wipes out all the dinosaurs on Earth—except for Barney… and Larry King.

So, to call me a germaphobe would be a vast understatement. It would be like calling Einstein merely ‘clever’ or saying that Donald Trump just ‘somewhat likes’ using hairspray.

I am a full-fledged germ freak. If I hear someone cough or sneeze, my ears suddenly morph into the radar of a Navy submarine. I quickly determine the distance between me and the sick person, and if I need to undertake any evasive maneuvers like Sean Connery in The Hunt for Red October. I will burrow into the ocean floor if need be. Don’t think I won’t.

If they’ve done something especially stupid, like cough directly into their own hand (instead of the crook of their elbow), I’ll glare at them maliciously while I catalogue every surface that they touch with their virus-ridden hand.

Yes, I really am that bad.

And, yes, it really is stupid to cough or sneeze into your own hand. You should always cover your face with your arm, instead. Less chance of spreading the virus to others.

Anyway, given the respiratory weakness of those with SMA, it is very difficult for us to keep our lungs clear. It is harder for us to cough. Harder for us to blow our nose. So, the drainage that might only be an annoyance to you, can become dangerous to a person like me. It can settle in our chest and potentially cause serious issues.

If I do get sick, I have to be very diligent. I vigorously use my respiratory devices (BiPAP, nebulizer, and CoughAssist) to prevent any complications. Under the best of circumstances, it can take me at least 10 days to 2 weeks to get over a mild cold. More serious illnesses can knock me out for even longer.

As happy and joyful as the holiday season is for me, it can be difficult, too. To the average person, an invite to a holiday cocktail party is immediately accepted. After all, who doesn’t like eggnog and a free selection of crackers and salami?

But, for me, deciding to attend the party would be a gamble. Like playing Russian Roulette or marrying a Kennedy. As much as I love eggnog (which, I do!), I must weigh that against the fact that at least one or two dipshits will probably attend the party even though they are sick and should stay home. Do I want to risk that they won’t sneeze near the salami? Do they know how to properly wash their hands?? What if they actually try to hug me???

Oh, the horror.

This kind of analysis runs through my head with every holiday invite that I receive. Before accepting anything, I quickly consult my calendar to make sure I have nothing important to do for the following two weeks after the event on the off-chance that some fuckhead gets me sick.

You can imagine why it might be easier for me to sit at home this time of year and watch badly-written Hallmark movies, instead. Fake snowstorms are far more palatable than hacking up part of a lung.

Nonetheless, it also isn’t healthy for a person to hide away in their house like the Unabomber. So, I try to venture out from time to time… armed with plenty of Purell, of course.

But, if I turn down an invite to your holiday event, please don’t take it personally. This doesn’t mean that I don’t like you, or that I hate salami… or eggnog. It just might mean that I’m worried your other guests might be carriers of the bubonic plague or some other horrible disease.

So, yeah… nothing personal.

Happy Holidays to you all!

xoears2

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Nutcrackers, Holiday Decorating & All The Lies We Tell

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Around three weeks ago, I was in a store and holiday music was already playing. Even though I snorted in disgust at the prematurity of it all, that didn’t stop me from admiring a collection of miniature Christmas trees roughly the size of Kevin Hart. You’ll be happy to note that I didn’t buy one, but I seriously considered it.

That set my mind into motion— into thinking about the holidays and when I’d put up my own decorations this year. I always tell myself that I’m going to wait until after Thanksgiving, but that never seems to happen. It’s more what I tell other people if they ask me when I put up my Christmas decorations. I always chirp, “Oh, I wait until after Thanksgiving.” But, in reality, I’m secretly hunkering down in my house around November 15th with empty nutcracker boxes strewn all over my dining room table and a rim of peppermint mocha residue around my lips.

It’s one of those secrets that we all keep and then lie to others about. You know, like how many times a day we floss (which is never), how many times a week we empty the lint compartment in the dryer (which is not enough) and if we wash our hands after we blow our nose (which should be all the time, but never is!).

When you are disabled, like me, you have to rely on others to help you put up your Christmas tree. You have to cajole and charm someone into climbing into the recesses of your garage to pull out the 7.5 foot plastic tree crammed in a cardboard box large enough for Kim Jung Un to stuff at least two dead bodies.

I’ve had the same artificial tree for quite a few years now. I don’t like having a real tree. It’s too much commitment. I have a hard enough time remembering to water my two houseplants, I definitely don’t have time to attend to a needy spruce tree. Plus, I don’t want something that will drop needles and crap all over my living room floor. If I wanted that, I’d just borrow a toddler.

Each year, there’s always a big moment of dread right before turning on the Christmas tree lights for the first time. That sinking feeling of wondering if this will be the year that it finally takes a giant poop. I’m sure I don’t need to describe this feeling any further. After all, if you’re a San Francisco 49ers fan, you feel this nearly every week.

Anyway, the last couple of seasons, my tree had begun to show its age. The lights began to dim, and large segments of the tree would randomly go dark, only to perk up again hours later. So, this week, I decided to take the plunge and get a new one. My new tree seems okay so far, but the branches were so smashed from being in the box on the long journey from China that the branches required considerable fluffing to stop them from resembling large marijuana joints. I suppose that’s one benefit to real trees, though— they are already fluffy.

However you may spend this holiday weekend, have a safe and happy one. If you need me, I’ll be here fluffing my tree, consuming large quantities of stuffing, and canoodling with my nutcrackers.

IMG_4507 (2)Happy Thanksgiving!

Hurricanes, Pregnant Pandas & Kardashians

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It’s been an intense 9 months. Between qualifying for the nusinersen treatments, waiting to get the ‘greenlight’ to begin injections, and then enduring the hectic schedule of getting my first four loading doses, it’s been a crazy ride. While Hurricane Spinraza was slow to arrive, it gained speed at the end and has packed quite a wallop. A positive, encouraging wallop… but, a wallop just the same.

Perhaps it’s too soon after Harvey, Irma, and Maria to make hurricane metaphors— but, I’m going to do it, anyway. If President Trump can pitch paper towels into a crowd of desperate Puerto Ricans like a carnie at a state fair, I guess anything goes.

Physically, receiving these injections isn’t easy. There’s discomfort, soreness, — and yes, sometimes pain— from the actual treatments themselves. There’s the exhaustion from the long traffic-ridden drives to and from Stanford. It’s a physical challenge. Surprisingly, though, an additional improvement that I noticed after beginning my injections? My residual soreness/pain resolved itself more quickly with each and every treatment. My body felt just a little tougher each time.

Despite the physical challenges, very few people discuss the emotional challenges of this Spinraza journey… especially for those of us that have lived with spinal muscular atrophy all of our lives. So much energy, especially by medical professionals, is focused on our physical health, that our emotional health can be neglected. But, these needs are just as important. The last nine months have taught me that.

Those of us with SMA are expert jugglers. We balance many things in our lives… work/school, family obligations, friends and the management of our care needs— all while keeping track of the pregnant Kardashians. Which is seriously hard work. I keep waiting for one of the reality stars to put up a live pregnancy camera in their house. You know like the zoos do when they have a pregnant female panda? And everyone livestreams the zoo camera online in the days leading up to the birth in the hopes of catching a glimpse of the pink squirming glob that comes out of her panda uterus?

Yeah… that.

(Think of the ratings, Kris Jenner… just think about it.)

Anyway, we SMAers can handle a lot. It’s challenging to juggle our usual tasks— but, we do it. Because we have to. But, when you add in the giant, heavy ball that is Spinraza, it’s impossible for us to keep all the other stuff in the air without dropping some shit on the floor. This is unfortunate because I literally can’t pick up any of the shit I drop on the floor. I have to wait until someone comes and picks it up for me.

After my last loading dose, I physically and emotionally crashed. I went into hibernation— like one of those mama bears that Sarah Palin rattles on about. For about a week and half, I didn’t want to do ANYTHING. I wanted to drop all my juggling balls and sit in the corner and watch episode after episode of the Gilmore Girls. Because if anyone could fix my problems, it was Lorelei Gilmore.

So, I wallowed. And stewed. And fretted. And took some Xanax.

This went on for a while. But, then it started to fade away. I felt the muscles quivering in my arms— reminding me that I had $500,000 swirling in my spinal fluid. It was time to get to work. I had fucked around for long enough.

I started exercising my arms, wrists and hands— with stretches and small weights. I began lifting things more easily than I had done in a while. While in the car, I held a water bottle to my mouth and drank (without a straw!). I lifted a one-pound bag of dried split peas from my lap to my desk— something I hadn’t been able to do at my physical evaluation at Stanford in February.

Things were happening.

So, now I’m trying to make these things part of my routine. I sit at my laptop (while I’m watching Netflix), and do my weird exercises. I’ve discovered that music isn’t my motivator… but, good o’ streaming TV does the trick!

Just maybe not a live Kardashian cam…

There’s only so much a person can handle.

striped

xoxo

(Please “follow” my blog for more updates…)

Fully Loaded

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My Spinraza journey has been one of highs and lows. I’ve had laughter and joy— but, also some tears and anxiety. It’s been a whirlwind of emotion that has frankly surprised me. If my journey were a story, I’d say that each injection introduced a new plot twist. You know, a plot twist like a long-lost, evil twin brother in a really good telenovela? Or, a sudden beheading on Game of Thrones? Or the content of a press conference at Trump’s White House? Because, in all those examples, where you think the plot is headed is never where it ends up.

Earlier this week, I had my fourth, and final, loading dose of Spinraza. After these initial doses, I will just have to return to Stanford four times a year for a single dose to maintain the level of drug in my body. Like topping off a tank of gas. Only this gas is worth more per ounce than plutonium. Just don’t tell Kim Jong-un about this stuff. Knowing him, he’d probably try to fling a vial of it at Japan.

My dose last month went incredibly smoothly, as I documented here. I had a confident, gladiator doctor that had the needle in the target zone so quickly that I thought he was joking. After all, it ain’t easy to negotiate the long lumbar needle through my spinal rods, even with the live x-ray guidance. So, this time, I figured that world-record speed would be hard to beat.

But, I was wrong. Upon arriving to the radiology department at the Neuroscience Center, I was informed that the A-Team was going to do my injection that morning. I felt a jolt of excitement. I get the same feeling when I get a coupon for 25% off at Bath & Body Works.

When I met the doctor, it wasn’t Mr. Gladiator… Rather, it was like if Dr. Meredith Grey had suddenly developed an undetermined-European accent and appeared at my bedside. Her friendly smile and slightly wavy dark blonde hair were straight from one of my favorite TV shows.

She was calm, capable and prepared. And she had the needle inserted so quickly that I didn’t even feel one damn thing. Like nothing. Not a twinge. Not a zing. Like Robert Redford was to Horse Whisperers, she was to lumbar punctures. She was the Lumbar Whisperer. I think she should put that on her business card…

Doctor. Neuroradiologist. Lumbar Whisperer.

It has a nice ring to it.

It wasn’t long before I was ushered to the recovery area. Feeling so relieved to have the injection complete, I quickly guzzled some water and an entire caffeinated Mountain Dew to ward off any potential spinal headache. (Spinal headaches are a very common side effect of this procedure— and caffeine and hydration can help prevent it.)

It was all going swimmingly… until the nurse returned to take my blood pressure and the numbers too closely resembled the final score of a record-breaking NBA basketball game. The excitement and caffeine had hit my bloodstream like a locomotive— and my blood pressure proved it.

They told me to relax, which is the one thing that is impossible to do when you’re a hypochondriac like me. If you tell me to relax, the exact opposite thing is going to happen— I’m going to panic.

My palms began to get sweaty and I became convinced that I was going to have a stroke and die— taking my expensive plutonium-loaded spinal fluid with me to the grave.

They observed me for over 45 minutes, waiting for the blood pressure to reduce. Which, of course, it didn’t. How could it when I had 4 sets of eyes watching me and telling me to calm down?

It’s no surprise that I began to cry. All the stress from the last few months— the waiting for the Spinraza, qualifying to get it, all the insurance hurdles, going through the discomfort of getting the injections… all of it… it hit me like a wave, pulling me under. I bet Trump gets the same feeling each morning when he wakes up and realizes he’s still president.

Soon after that, the nurse took pity on me and let me go home. My relief was enormous. I don’t remember much of the drive back home to Patterson— I was in a daze of relief, exhaustion and, yes, joy, too.

For you see, I had done it. I had survived my loading doses. I wouldn’t have to do another injection again for 4 months. It seemed like bliss.

Stay tuned, though, for more updates on my progress… I will be chronicling everything here (lucky you!). Most of all, thank you for your support on this journey… it has meant so much.

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Commuters, Gladiators & Me

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After my experience with my last Spinraza injection, I came into Dose #3 like a soldier ready for battle. If there was a potential contingency, I had already thought of it— at least twice. I was like fucking General Dwight D. Eisenhower in advance of the invasion of Normandy. I was mentally and physically prepared. I had taken a mini Xanax and hydrated like an Olympic marathoner. I was ready. Fear me and my Spinraza greatness!!

On the morning of the injection, I woke up at 3:45am— a time when most reasonable folks are asleep. But, if you are President Donald Trump, it’s your favorite time to sit in the dark and send weird messages to your 36 million Twitter followers.

I got dressed, and we ventured out into the pre-dawn morning to make the trek from Patterson to Stanford. We encountered a purplish sunrise and about 765,983 damn commuters clogging the roadways.

I was distracted by my upcoming procedure by contemplating the utter horror all those drivers endure each day on the roads. How do they do it? How do they manage to survive that commute each and every day? Maybe they were the ones that needed the Xanax— not me.

We arrived well in advance of my appointment and managed to snag one of the coveted handicapped spots right in the front of the Neuroscience building. Getting one of those parking spots is like winning the lotto, only way better because you actually have a chance of winning. (Yes, I’m talking about you, feverish Powerball players. Let’s be real — the more millions in the jackpot, the less chance you will win. And spending more money to win isn’t a guarantee, either. Just ask Hillary Clinton.)

For each of my Spinraza injections thus far, I’ve had a different team of doctors performing the procedure. Stanford is a teaching institution, so there’s a rotating group of doctors eager to plunge that needle into my wonky, curvy spine. This time, my team was extra-confident. They strode into the room like Russell Crowe in Gladiator. After examining my scans, one doctor proudly announced, “I’ll get this done in 20 minutes.

My last procedure had taken over 90 minutes. In my mind, I thought, “Bullshit, Turbo. You’ve never met a spine like mine. I’m your damn Kilimanjaro. I’m fucking Mount Everest.

But, I stayed quiet. I didn’t want to squelch his enthusiasm. I also didn’t want to piss him off since he was the one with the really big needle.

I got into position on the table and they began. I listened to their low, confident chatter behind me as I let my mind wander. I thought about food— as I often do, generally. I was hungry since I had to fast for the hours prior to the procedure. I contemplated lunch….. and then I felt a zing of heat down my left leg.

Whoa– what was that?” I called out as my nerves quivered in response.

I’m in,” Dr. Confidence remarked behind me― like a member of the DAR coolly ordering a Cobb Salad at a country club.

My brain stalled for a moment. I looked up at the clock on the wall in front of me… a mere 20 minutes had passed. I had difficulty computing what he had said. I sputtered, “Wait— what?! Are you for real?

Yes. I’ve already begun to collect the spinal fluid before we inject the Spinraza.

Like a Looney Tunes cartoon character, my eyeballs began to bug out of my head, “Holy shit! You weren’t kidding at the beginning, were you?

Nope,” The Radiological Gladiator replied.

Elation flooded my veins. I felt like it had suddenly become Christmas Morning and Santa had brought me a really great present. Like a My Little Pony. Or an Easy Bake Oven. Or a $125,000 injection administered pain-free and in World Record Time. SWEET JESUS, SANTA IS REAL!

I was wheeled out of the fluoroscopy room just a few minutes later, my face wreathed in a smile, while clutching another, empty magic little vial in my fist. VICTORY WAS MINE!

Like Russell Crowe, I wanted to yell out, “My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius, commander of the Armies of the North, General of the Felix Legions, loyal servant to the true emperor, Marcus Aurelius. And I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next!!

I didn’t yell that, of course, because I didn’t want them to think that the Spinraza was making me psychotic.

So, instead, when I returned to the room, I gulped down some water, and a caffeinated Mountain Dew to ward off the spinal headache. Then, I scarfed down a sandwich and sent a flurry of texts to my loved ones— my more-nimble fingers flying across the screen like super-sonic gnats.

Yes… Spinraza works, mIMG_4323y friends!

xoxo

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Two Weeks Later…

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It’s amazing how much can change in two weeks. Wars have been fought and won in a shorter span of time and, if you are a believer, than the entire world was created by the Almighty in a mere 7 days— including, Adam, Eve, snakes, assorted shrubberies, and the Fuji apples you can buy at Savemart for $1.29 a pound.

And if all that wasn’t enough excitement, I also made the front page of the estimable Patterson Irrigator newspaper― instead of my column’s usual spot on page 5, or 7. So, yeah, a lot can change very fast.

Two weeks ago, I had my first injection of Spinraza. (For those of you that haven’t been following my journey, you can read my past writings on this topic HERE.) It wasn’t long after that initial treatment that I first began to feel that magical little $125,000 serum at my work in my spinal fluid— like busy Oompa Loompas toiling at Willy Wonka’s factory over a steaming vat of marshmallow cream.

The night following the injection, I woke up at 2am absolutely starving— like I hadn’t eaten anything for days. If you know me at all, you’d know this is an impossibility. There are few things in this life I love more than food. And if I could think of what those things actually are, I would write them right here.

I spent the next 3 days basically eating everything that wasn’t nailed down— especially things with protein. I was like a mama grizzly bear that hadn’t seen food since she went into hibernation last December. A real grizzly― not the fake ones that Sarah Palin seems to find everywhere she goes.

To give you an example, after already consuming breakfast, lunch and three snacks, one afternoon around 4pm I got hungry again and began casting my eyes around my kitchen. My radar settled upon a pouch of cashew nuts on the counter. For a few minutes, I attempted to open the reusable zippered fastener on the pouch. But, I quickly grew impatient and annoyed when my not-strong-enough fingers couldn’t open the lip. Undeterred, I grabbed my purple Crayola kid scissors (the only kind that I can use without hurting myself) and proceeded to desecrate the thick pouch until I had wormed a two-inch hole into the plastic. As the soothing scent of roasted cashews wafted up to my nose, I knew that victory was at-hand. THE CASHEWS WERE MINE!

This inexplicable hunger, this rabid feeding frenzy, culminated in a fluttering feeling in the muscles of my neck, my upper arms and my right hand. I began to notice that things were just a touch easier to do. My Sonicare toothbrush felt lighter. I was typing faster on my computer. I was able to grab my water bottle just a bit more smoothly. My voice sounded stronger. My respiratory numbers were up. I could text jokes about Mr. Trump to my friends even more swiftly than I had two weeks ago.

Things were happening.

It’s difficult to fathom that the little vial of muscle juice was already working. But, while a great deal of things are “all in my head,” I guarantee than this definitely wasn’t. Just because I could convince 11-year-old me that Santa was real, despite all the evidence to the contrary, this doesn’t mean that I’m imagining that the Spinraza was already helping. While my imagination is incredibly well-honed, it’s not that good.

This week, I head back to Stanford for Dose #2. I never thought I’d be this excited to get another shot into my spine. Never. Just as I thought I’d never live to every meteorologist IN THE WORLD go apeshit over an upcoming solar eclipse.

Seriously, though, this hype is way too much— just like the Twilight movies. Once the solar eclipse is actually done, everyone is going to forget all about it… just like they forgot how they once found Robert Pattinson brooding and charming.

Anyway, please wish me luck for Dose #2.

Who knows what the next two weeks will bring?

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